So I lay in the old dentist's chair, And I gaze up his nose in despair, And his drill it do whine, In these molars of mine

oh-iwish-i'd-looked

#1

So I lay in the old dentist’s chair,
And I gaze up his nose in despair,
And his drill it do whine,
In these molars of mine.
“Two amalgum”, he’ll say, “for in there.”
(a) Why was the poet lying in the dentist’s chair in despair?
(b) Explain the lines, “And his drill it do whine, In these molars of mine.”?
© What does ‘amalgum’ mean?


#2

(a) The poet was lying in the dentist’s chair waiting for the dentist to use his drill to remove the decayed teeth. The poet was ‘in despair’ because she expected a lot of pain when the dentist drilled her teeth.
(b) These lines means that the dentist’s drill makes a whining sound when it drills out the decayed molar teeth of the poet.
© The word is actually ‘amalgam’, which is an alloy of mercury and silver used as a filling in teeth.